Services / Pre-Purchase Inspection / New Construction Inspection / Pre-Listing Inspection

  • Well Water Testing

    • FHA Testing includes: Nitrites, Nitrates, Bacteria and Lead
    • Bacteria Testing Includes: Coliform Bacteria only
    • Arsenic Testing can be added to either FHA or Bacteria Tests
    • Copper Testing can also be added to the FHA Test
  • Septic Testing Inspection

    • Contracted with Licensed Professional
  • Detached Buildings/Garages

    • At Time of the Inspection
  • Termite Inspection

    • Contracted with Licensed Professional
  • Pool/Spa Inspections

    • Contracted with Licensed Professional
  • Radon Measurement

    • National Certified Residential Measurement Provider

When it comes to the biggest investment that you will ever make don't leave the condition of that investment to chance.

A pre-purchase inspection is performed when you have located a home that you want to buy and usually after a purchase contract has been accepted by the seller.

This inspection will tell you the condition of the home and the areas that need to be repaired before closing. The items in the inspection report can be presented to the seller to have the items repaired before closing.

New construction inspection is performed on a newly built home about one-two weeks before closing, so any items that need to be addressed can be repaired by the builder before closing.

A pre-listing inspection is performed on your home before it is placed on the market to learn its condition. This will allow you time to have the items repaired, or get quotes on the repairs before the buyer has their inspection performed. It also prevents unpleasant surprises by the possibility of costly repairs by the buyer’s inspection.

We Serve:

Charlotte

Matthews

Indian Trail

Mint Hill

Stallings

Weddington

Marvin

Waxhaw

Monroe

Harrisburg

Concord

Davidson

Cornelius

Mooresville

Lake Norman

Belmont

Mt. Holly

Gastonia

Rock Hill

Lake Wylie

Fort Mill

Tega Cay

*Please Call for Quote if Not in These Areas

Radon-1

Radon

86 rn

Radon from soil is the main cause of radon problems. Sometimes radon enters the home through well water. In a small number of homes, the building materials can give off radon, too.

Radon is a colorless, tasteless, odorless gas that is caused by decaying uranium. It is in the ground just about everywhere and enters the home through the cracks in the ground and foundation. When you breathe air containing radon, you increase the risk of getting lung cancer. The Surgeon General of the United States has warned that radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.

The only way to know the radon levels in a home, is to test. The EPA and Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third level for radon. Any home can have a radon problem. This means older homes and new homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, as well as homes with basements or those without basements. Do not rely on radon test results that have been taken in other homes in your neighborhood. Homes which are next to each other can have different radon levels.

If Your Home Has Not Yet Been Tested For Radon:

Have a test taken as soon as possible. The radon test result is important information about your home's radon level. When hiring a contractor to test your residence, protect yourself by hiring a qualified company. Many states require radon professionals to be licensed, certified, or registered. North Carolina does not require testers to be certified. However, without formal training and continuing education, you cannot be sure that the tester is following the EPA protocols and that the results from measurement are accurate. Mecklenburg Inspections, Inc. is a certified Residential Measurement Provider with the National Environmental Health Association, National Radon Proficiency Program. Our inspectors are Certified Radon Measurement Providers, using CR 1028 continuous radon monitors and/or charcoal canisters. We use the continuous monitors as a first choice, but do have charcoal canisters as a backup depending on the conditions.

Our monitors are calibrated every year by the manufacturer. Each inspector takes 16 hours of continuing education classes, along with certification on the equipment and competency testing by a third-party entity. Mecklenburg Inspections is also certified as analytic services so that your radon report is provided the next business day.

Make sure that all parties are aware of testing procedures before starting a radon measurement in the home. The home will need to be in "closed house" conditions 12 hours prior to testing. For more information, visit the EPA's Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon at:

 http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/hmbyguid.html

A notice should be placed at the home and removed once the testing is complete.

Radon and Granite Countertops

Radon originating in the soil beneath homes is a more common problem and a far larger public health risk than radon from granite building materials. Granite, like any other stone, may contain veins of naturally occurring radioactive elements like uranium, thorium, and their radioactive decay products. These trace concentrations may vary from stone to stone, or even within a single slab of granite.

If present, uranium, thorium or radium will decay into radon, a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that may cause lung cancer. Radon released from granite building materials can be released over the lifetime of use but typically will be diluted by ventilation.

In addition to radon, naturally occurring radioactive elements in the granite can emit small amounts of beta and gamma radiation. However, any radiation present would decrease quickly with increasing distance from the source. It is extremely unlikely that radiation from granite countertops would increase annual radiation doses above normal, natural background levels.

Identifying Radiation in Granite Countertops

Identifying the presence and concentration of radioactive elements in each specific granite countertop requires sophisticated instruments. These instruments require proper calibration and a knowledge and trained user to interpret the results. If you are interested in learning about testing methods, information is available from your state’s radiation protection program.

Radon originating from the soil beneath homes is a more common problem and a far larger public health risk than radon from granite building materials. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer and is estimated to cause tens of thousands of lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year. To reduce the risk of lung cancer from exposure to radon, EPA recommends testing all homes for radon and mitigating high levels, regardless of whether the home contains granite countertops.

Radon

Radon from soil is the main cause of radon problems. Sometimes radon enters the home through well water. In a small number of homes, the building materials can give off radon, too.

Radon is a colorless, tasteless, odorless gas that is caused by decaying uranium. It is in the ground just about everywhere and enters the home through the cracks in the ground and foundation. When you breathe air containing radon, you increase the risk of getting lung cancer. The Surgeon General of the United States has warned that radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.

The only way to know the radon levels in a home, is to test. The EPA and Surgeon General recommend testing all homes below the third level for radon. Any home can have a radon problem. This means older homes and new homes, well-sealed and drafty homes, as well as homes with basements or those without basements. Do not rely on radon test results that have been taken in other homes in your neighborhood. Homes which are next to each other can have different radon levels.

If Your Home Has Not Yet Been Tested For Radon:

Have a test taken as soon as possible. The radon test result is important information about your home's radon level. When hiring a contractor to test your residence, protect yourself by hiring a qualified company. Many states require radon professionals to be licensed, certified, or registered. North Carolina does not require testers to be certified. However, without formal training and continuing education, you cannot be sure that the tester is following the EPA protocols and that the results from measurement are accurate. Mecklenburg Inspections, Inc. is a certified Residential Measurement Provider with the National Environmental Health Association, National Radon Proficiency Program. Our inspectors are Certified Radon Measurement Providers, using CR 1028 continuous radon monitors and/or charcoal canisters. We use the continuous monitors as a first choice, but do have charcoal canisters as a backup depending on the conditions.

Our monitors are calibrated every year by the manufacturer. Each inspector takes 16 hours of continuing education classes, along with certification on the equipment and competency testing by a third-party entity. Mecklenburg Inspections is also certified as analytic services so that your radon report is provided the next business day.

Make sure that all parties are aware of testing procedures before starting a radon measurement in the home. The home will need to be in "closed house" conditions 12 hours prior to testing. For more information, visit the EPA's Home Buyer's and Seller's Guide to Radon at:

 http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/hmbyguid.html

A notice should be placed at the home and removed once the testing is complete.

Radon and Granite Countertops

Radon originating in the soil beneath homes is a more common problem and a far larger public health risk than radon from granite building materials. Granite, like any other stone, may contain veins of naturally occurring radioactive elements like uranium, thorium, and their radioactive decay products. These trace concentrations may vary from stone to stone, or even within a single slab of granite.

If present, uranium, thorium or radium will decay into radon, a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas that may cause lung cancer. Radon released from granite building materials can be released over the lifetime of use but typically will be diluted by ventilation.

In addition to radon, naturally occurring radioactive elements in the granite can emit small amounts of beta and gamma radiation. However, any radiation present would decrease quickly with increasing distance from the source. It is extremely unlikely that radiation from granite countertops would increase annual radiation doses above normal, natural background levels.

Identifying Radiation in Granite Countertops

Identifying the presence and concentration of radioactive elements in each specific granite countertop requires sophisticated instruments. These instruments require proper calibration and a knowledge and trained user to interpret the results. If you are interested in learning about testing methods, information is available from your state’s radiation protection program.

Radon originating from the soil beneath homes is a more common problem and a far larger public health risk than radon from granite building materials. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer and is estimated to cause tens of thousands of lung cancer deaths in the U.S. each year. To reduce the risk of lung cancer from exposure to radon, EPA recommends testing all homes for radon and mitigating high levels, regardless of whether the home contains granite countertops.